The Indie VigilThis Is How It Feels To Be Indie – The Indie Vigil #18

By | posted on 16th December 2015

"Open Sans", Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; margin: 0px; padding: 3px 4px; color: rgb(153, 153, 153); width: auto;">This Is How It Feels To Be INDIE! - Broadcast 16/12/15 by Radio_Scarborough on Mixcloud

Welcome to your weekly catch up on the "This Is How It Feels To Be Indie" radio show hosted by Adam Jeffery on Radio Scarborough. Last week's show had all the usual great music from the likes of Saint Etienne, The Smiths and Midlake. There was also new music from Velettes and The Supersonic Jets.

Check out the full track listing on the Indie Radio Facebook page and give us a "like" and a share please! You can also listen again to the show in full on Mixcloud here.

The weekly feature of "The Best off a Best Of" (hosted in conjunction with Everything Indie Over 40) was back this week. The album in question was Carry On Up The Charts - The Best Of The Beautiful South and the top track chosen by the folks online was "Song For Whoever". There was no t-shirt to be won this week as they have all been snapped up, but all those who picked the winning track were mentioned live on air. You can't say fairer than that now, can you?

Johny stopped by as usual while Adam nipped out to have a mince pie and listen to Shakin' Stevens on his Sony Walkman and gave us his "Lost Indie Classics". This week he chose "Vicar in a Tutu" by The Smiths and "After The Rain" by The Railway Children. Did you get the connection? Yes, it was storm Desmond, which hit the UK and caused a lot of devastation. Our thoughts are with everyone affected by the floods.

And now onto this week's Vigil. This week's guest is Tony Pearson. But before we find out what tracks Tony has picked, let's find out a bit more about him:

I came to Scarborough 10 years ago and set up my own landscape gardening business. I recently became a qualified electrician. I'm married to Soph and have two children, Angus and India. I've been involved with a number of local bands (The Jawline of Julianne Moore/The East Coast Vagabonds/Grand Theft Audio/The Grand Urge) as a guitarist, bass player and singer. I'm interested in all types of music, especially anything that's a bit different from the norm.

I was introduced to the show by fellow guest Paul Burnett. It's a great show and a great station! Thanks to Adam for inviting me on!"

And now here are Tony's choices:

Something Old

The Clash – "Clampdown"

My old boss was an avid punk, in fact he still is, he still dyes his hair, he still has nose rings and he still wears beaten up jeans and DMs. He absolutely refuses to conform or grow up and still has a healthy rebellious streak. A proper punk I suppose. He's 55 this year. Our work vans were always full of old tapes by The Damned, New Model Army or The Clash. Listening to this music and specifically music by The Clash brings us to my "old" track. "Clampdown" was a musical epiphany when I first heard it, the feedback drenched beginning, the intro, like a train shooting past, the propulsive drumbeat going through the heart of the song and it's discordant, out of sync ending, elevated it above the usual 3 chord simplicity of most of the early punk songs and I love it.

Something Borrowed

Beta Band – "Assessment"

My brother in law is a massive fan of this band and it's him I have to thank for getting me into them properly. We were both lucky enough to catch them on their final tour before they broke up in 2004 and considering the complexity of the arrangements for a lot of their music, they were one of the only bands I've ever seen that sound "just like the record". Although all the members have gone on to pursue other projects, nothing they've done since matches the oddness or genius of what they came up with in this band. This is the opening track from their final album Heroes to Zeroes. They're very much missed.

Something New

Friendly Fires – "Hawaiian Air"

I first saw Friendly Fires on Jools Holland's show four years ago when they released their last album Pala. Their music, like their performances, is infectious and full of energy, but without ever being annoying. "Hawaiian Air" was the song they played to end the show and it was mesmerising to watch. The bright colours, the rhythmic, tropical sound, the dancing, the bursts of confetti at the end, it was like a beach party and everyone was invited. Writing up beat, fun music that isn't cheesy or forced is a difficult thing to do musically but they seem to manage it effortlessly. 

And that's it for this week's Vigil. Thanks to Tony for sharing his song choices with us and why he's picked them.

Like the end of 2015, the final Vigil is approaching us fast. Only 2 more to go and then that's it. There may well be a new feature in the New Year though, so stay tuned.

And finally, as always, don't forget to tune in to http://www.radioscarborough.co.uk/ on a Wednesday night to hear some great music and chat.